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Johns Hopkins Alumni News

03/24/2015 - 11:05am

Louise Erdrich, A&S ’79, MA Writing Sems, author of the novels “Love Medicine” and “The Round House,” will receive the Library of Congress Prize for American Fiction this year.

The prize, which will be awarded during the National Book Festival on Sept. 5, is given to writers with “unique, enduring voices” whose work addresses the American experience. Past winners include John Grisham, Toni Morrison and E.L. Doctorow.

Read more here.

03/16/2015 - 4:37pm

Frank Wu, A&S '88, recently went on a college visit to Johns Hopkins with his niece. Read about what he learned in this Huffington Post article.

03/12/2015 - 1:51pm

The presidency of the Metropolitan Museum of Art is a fund-raising and administrative position that does not require a background in art. But in choosing Daniel H. Weiss to help lead the nation’s largest art museum, the Met has decided to combine both business acumen and scholarly credentials.

Its board voted on Tuesday to elect Mr. Weiss, a medievalist with an M.B.A. who since 2013 has been president of Haverford College in Pennsylvania, as its next president and chief operating officer. In his new job he will oversee day-to-day operations, an endowment of about $3 billion, a staff of about 1,500 and an annual operating budget of more than $300 million.

Read more here.

03/10/2015 - 12:49pm

Johns Hopkins University graduate programs in education, medicine, public health, and nursing—and in individual disciplines including biomedical engineering—remain among the best in the nation, according to the newest U.S. News & World Report "Best Graduate School" rankings.

The report, released Tuesday, ranks JHU's programs in public health and education No. 1 in the nation. Johns Hopkins is also ranked No. 2 for nursing and No. 3 for medicine.

Read more on the Hub: http://hub.jhu.edu/2015/03/10/us-news-grad-school-rankings

 

03/09/2015 - 2:38pm

When Zoe Fraade-Blanar, Engr '02, and Aaron Glazer, A&S '02 (BA/MA), told their friends they'd started a business selling giant, round stuffed animals, they were met with looks of bewilderment—followed by a chorus of, "Can I have one?" Founded in 2007, Squishable offers hundreds of unconventional plush toys, from cinnamon buns to three-headed dogs, in its online store. Fans on social networks help Squishable develop new products; many submit designs online, and the company later brings those ideas to life. The company's founders link much of their success to this open-source platform—dubbed Project Open Squish—that allows users to play a role in generating ideas.

Read the Q&A in the latest issue of Johns Hopkins Magazine.

03/03/2015 - 11:03am

Johns Hopkins University's Milton S. Eisenhower Library hosts a new photography exhibition in its Q-level gallery entitled In Wake: Rising Seas, Vanishing Islands. The photographs, taken by senior Justin Falcone, document the rapidly changing human geography of the southern Pacific Ocean.

The exhibition, which will be on display through mid-March, challenges traditional conceptions of the South Pacific as paradise. Instead, the photos depict the dynamic reality of living by the ocean as sea levels rise as a result of environmental change.

Read more on The Hub.

03/02/2015 - 11:38am
dance marathon 2015
Photo via the Johns Hopkins Children's Center Facebook page.

The Johns Hopkins University Dance Marathon raised $44,407.05 on Saturday night - a 27% increase from a year ago. Proceeds go to the Johns Hopkins Children's Center.

The Dance Marathon is one of the many student activities the Johns Hopkins Alumni Association supports through our student grants program. Learn more here.

The Dance Marathon is a nationwide movement, involving students at over 150 colleges and high schools across the country, who raise money for the Children’s Miracle Network (CMN) hospital in their community.

Read more and check out photos on The Hub.

02/27/2015 - 10:16am

Please join us for the Women in Business (WIB) Women's History Month “Celebration of Remarkable Women” Campaign starting on March 1. The WIB Affinity is hosting this campaign to celebrate Women’s History Month and to gear up for our upcoming 3rd Annual Remarkable Women Conference on March 27th in Washington, DC.

Each day check out the Johns Hopkins Alumni Association on Facebook and Twitter to learn about a different woman who has made a lasting, often times historical impact in their field, community, or in the lives of others. Every Friday, instead of a fact, we will ask a trivia question about a remarkable woman in Johns Hopkins history. The first person to correctly identify her win a $5 gift card to Starbucks.

Please also check out all the great things WIB is doing and register for the JHU WIB Leadership Conference in March.

02/26/2015 - 5:32pm

Connecting the right people to each other in Silicon Valley is at the core of Kristi Ebong’s mission to harmonize the tech sector with the health care field.

“Health care isn’t just about doctors,” asserts Ebong, who earned an MPH and MBA in 2011 through JHU’s dual degree program. “It requires people across an extraordinary array of disciplines coming together and understanding each other to really impact lives.”

Post Bloomberg School, Ebong migrated west to settle in California, joining a large contingent of alums from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, where she had studied as an undergraduate. Tapping into a broad network in the Golden State proved vital as she continued her work as an independent consultant.

Now, clients like Stanford Health Care depend on her to evaluate products worth piloting across the health system: an mHealth app, for instance, that could help prevent patient readmissions.

Read more on the School of Public Health website.

02/24/2015 - 10:54am

Game one started out fairly crisp, then deteriorated to a brick fest. The two teams—a collection of men who could be your older brother, uncle, or grandfather—traded a salvo of ugly shots and turnovers.

Layups were missed, rebounds bungled. The cluttered floor spacing would make a coach weep. Somewhere, the ghost of James Naismith likely shook his head and wished he'd never seen a peach basket.

But then came a moment of pure hardwood magic. Chuck, a six-foot-five-ish man in his late 40s and the husband of a Johns Hopkins staff member, threw a gem of a half-court outlet pass to Bill, a 67-year-old history professor and modern China expert, who shoveled a toss to Ralph, a white-haired, goggled astronomer, for an uncontested game-winning layup. That's victory, one university–style.

Now who's got next? Because here, there's always another game.

Read more on The Hub.